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Asa Collinsworth "Colley" HILL

Male 1826 - 1913  (~ 86 years)


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  • Name Asa Collinsworth "Colley" HILL 
    Born Nov 1826  Hillsboro, Jasper Co., GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 9 Oct 1913  Beeville, Bee Co., TX Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 

    • Asa C. and Mary Chapman had two sons. He signed his letter with his initials "A.C." but was often referred to as "Colley". His middle name is often written as Collingsworth.

      (The following is from the New Handbook of TX, Vol 3, published 1996 by the Texas State Historical Association) (Also found online in its entirety)

      "Asa was born in Jasper co., GA and brought to TX by his family in 1835. He attended Rutersville College and after Sam Houston became U. S. Senator in 1846, Asa served as Houston's amanuensis in Washington. He enlisted Sept. 20, 1847 in the Mexican War, in Capt. John Allen Veatch's company; Col. Peter Hansborough Bell's regiment, TX Mounted Volunteers. Asa was Dr. Work's hospital steward in Presidio de Rio Grande, Coahuila, Mexico, before commanding a spy company in the battle of Piedra Pinta. He was mustered out of service Sept. 20, 1848.

      He volunteered with the rank of Lt. in 1856 in Gen. Wm. Walker's Nicaraguan army. After recruiting men and raising money in the U.S. he sailed from New Orleans to Punta Arenas Jan. 4, 1857, where he assumed duties of adjutant to Col. Samuel A. Lockridge. On the retreat down the San Juan River, Hill was wounded when the boiler of the steamer, J. N. Scott, blew up. In 1859 he was Captain of the Texas Rangers. He continued his work as Captain of Spies, sending important information to Houston. Later he became crippled by osteomylitis and was limited to horseback duty, but he volunteered as a civilian guide early in the Civil War. The captain of the company, claiming he was a soldier, brought charges of insubordination against him and he was convicted in a court martial in Oct. 1861. He was imprisoned for six months before being vindicated.

      He was in Mexico with his brother, John C. C. Hill, in 1866 and 1867. From 1870 - 73 Asa progressed from first lieutenant to colonel in the Frontier Forces and Texas State Police. He was wounded five times in his career.

      His brother, John C.C. Hill worked as a civil engineer in railroad building as well as mining. A. C. Hill worked with him on some of these rail projects between 1876 and 1884 in Mexico. Several letters are transcribed between the two brothers in the book by Robert M. Bartlett, "Those Valiant Texans; A Breed Apart," pub. 1989. pp. 171-172. A. C. Hill wrote from Oakville, Liveoak Co., TX on Nov. 21, 1880. Another letter was dated June 7, 1886 from Eagle Pass, Maverick Co., TX on the border of Mexico to his brother-in-law, Gen. Wm. G. Webb in Albany, Shackford Co., TX.

      Found on 1880 Texas census at Ancestry.com:
      ASA C. HILL
      State: TX
      County: Live Oak County
      Township: Oakville
      Year: 1880
      Record Type: Federal Population Schedule
      Page: 456
      Database: TX 1880 Federal Census Index


      He died in Beeville, TX and was buried on the ranch of his son, Judge William Asa Hill, near Clareville."

      There is a slight variation in his biography from the more recent New Texas Handbook Online:

      "HILL, ASA COLLINSWORTH (1826-1913). Asa Collinsworth (Colley) Hill, soldier, filibuster, and ranger, son of Elizabeth (Barksdale) and Asa Hill, was born near Hillsboro, Jasper County, Georgia, in November 1826. He was brought to Texas in 1835 by his father. He attended Rutersville College. After Sam Houston became United States senator in 1846, Hill served as Houston's amanuensis in Washington. In the Mexican War he enlisted on September 20, 1847, in Capt. John Allen Veatch's company, Col. Peter Hansborough Bell'sqv regiment, Texas Mounted Volunteers. Hill was Dr. Work's hospital steward in Presidio de Rio Grande, Coahuila, Mexico, before commanding a spy company in the battle of Piedra Pinta. He was mustered out of the service on September 20, 1848. He married Mary Chapman on October 3, 1849, in Rutersville; they had two sons. In 1856 he volunteered with the rank of lieutenant in Gen. William Walker's Nicaraguan army. After recruiting men and raising money in the United States, he sailed from New Orleans and arrived in Punta Arenas on January 4, 1857, where he assumed the duties of adjutant to Col. Samuel A. Lockridge. On the retreat down the San Juan River after the unsuccessful assault on Fort Castillo, Hill was wounded when the boiler of the steamer J. N. Scott blew up. In 1859 he was a captain in the Texas Rangers. The first official information Houston received of the forays of Juan N. Cortina was a letter from Capt. William Gerard Tobin dated Brownsville, December 16, 1859, brought to Houston by Hill, who was in several engagements including that at Bolsa Bend. His last report to Houston was from Brownsville on February 9, 1860, signed A. C. Hill, Captain of Spies. Crippled by osteomylitis and limited to horseback duty, he volunteered as a civilian guide early in the Civil War. The captain of the company to which he was attached, claiming he was a soldier, brought charges of insubordination against him and he was convicted in a court martial in October 1861. He was imprisoned for six months before being vindicated. Hill later wrote that he was imprisoned because of his "adherence to the cause of the Union" but there was no hint of treason or sedition in his lengthy trial. He was in Mexico in 1866 and again in 1867 and was with his brother, John C. C. Hill, when the latter obtained the release from prison of Gen. Pedro de Ampudia who was under sentence of death for allegedly siding with Maximilian. From 1870 to 1873 Asa Hill progressed from first lieutenant to colonel in the Frontier Forces and Texas State Policeqv with much of his duty in areas of Indian raids. During his career he was wounded five times. In 1889 while living in Washington, he participated in the George Washington Centenary ceremonies in New York City as a member of the District of Columbia National Guard. From 1904 to 1907 he traveled about Texas gathering data for a history of Texas that he never completed. He died on October 9, 1913, in Beeville and was buried on the ranch of his son, Judge William Asa Hill, near Clareville."

      BIBLIOGRAPHY: Vertical Files, Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin.
      Joseph E. Blanton

      Found on Ancestry.com, Texas Land Patents for Asa Hill in 1856 and 1857. Is this "our" Asa?
      Grantee: Asa Hill
      Certificate: 354
      Patentee: Asa Hill
      Patent Date: 13 May 1856
      Acres: 2921.88
      District: Fannin
      County: Wise
      File: 563
      Patent #: 481
      Patent Volume: 11
      Class: Fan. 1st.

      Grantee: Asa Hill
      Certificate: 354
      Patentee: Asa Hill
      Patent Date: 16 Dec 1857
      Acres: 1685.63
      District: Fannin
      County: Wise
      File: 563
      Patent #: 876
      Patent Volume: 12
      Class: Fan. 1st.



    Person ID I0102  Hill Genealogy
    Last Modified 3 Jul 2008 

    Father Loe Wayne BAILEY,   b. Private 
    Mother Mable Iva MORLAND,   b. 18 Aug 1912, Fairvalley, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1991, Collinsville, Okla. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Family ID F0018  Group Sheet